What’s the purpose in Christ revealing himself to the world?

Part of the answer lies within the question itself; to reveal to the world the Son of God whom they’ve rejected or have not seen. Yet it goes deeper than that. We’re probably certain from our expectations of judgment upon the disobedient and wicked, what the Lord intends for the world. But is that viewpoint a complete one? Let’s consider it from a broader context.

How is eternal life inherited, Don’t we already have immortality?

The contrast throughout all of scripture, old and new, is between death for those made from the dust of the ground and the hope of immortality made available to all in the work of Yeshua, the Christ. That work comes through death, and is manifested for his faithful servants at the resurrection of the firstfruits of salvation.

When is the inheritance promised to the saints delivered?

This question reaches to the core of some very challenging presuppositions, and the answer is vital to every Christian desiring to be faithful to our Lord and Christ. So to begin, let’s see how scripture defines and characterizes the inheritance we seek. We can begin in 1 Peter 1. 1 Peter 1:3-5 (ESV)3 Blessed beContinue reading “When is the inheritance promised to the saints delivered?”

What is the Kingdom of Priests?

In this article we continue by looking briefly into the work of Yeshua the Christ and his kingdom-building process, beginning with the kingdom of the priests. There is a process to kingdom-building, and it begins with the King and High Priest, whose example and preeminence clear the way for those who will follow as heirs of the glory given by God the Father.

What is the hour of trial brought upon the world?

The answer to the article’s title depends primarily on what presuppositions are held about the events to which the hour of trial might point. A larger context for understanding these verses comes from the vision and the vision-giver who is revealing the things that have been, the things that are, and those things yet to come (Revelation 1:19).

Isn’t the Philadelphia church promised, by Christ himself, deliverance from the hour of trial?

This question is based on the promise of Christ to the Philadelphia congregation recorded in Revelation 3. Christ is surely reminded of his warning to his disciples regarding their treatment in the world. How they would be handed over to death and hated for his name’s sake. In all this tribulation they are encouraged to endure patiently, thereby securing their salvation.

How do the examples of God’s deliverance relate to his work in Christ Jesus?

In this article, let’s continue to look deeper into 2 Peter 2 and examine the other examples of God’s deliverance cited there. Peter’s objective is not just to show how God is able to rescue the Godly from trials, it’s also to show his power to restrain the wicked sufficiently so that the whole world throughout time is not engulfed in wickedness until his work in Christ Jesus is underway.

Aren’t previous examples of deliverance by God illustrative of the church’s deliverance from the Great Tribulation?

The answer to this question isn’t a simple one because the question itself has layers to it that must be resolved. This article looks into a few of those layers; the presuppositions behind the question, the characteristics of previous deliverance, and the motivation behind this deliverance.

According to 1 Thessalonians 5:9-10 the church is exempt from wrath, so isn’t it true they won’t enter the Day of the Lord?

The assurance and comfort expressed to believers in 1 Thessalonians 5:9-10 has limitations depending on one’s expectations for the Day of the Lord. Exemption from wrath is coexistent with the reconciliation to God obtained through belief in Christ. However, the promise of exemption from wrath only applies to God’s wrath, making one’s presupposition about the Day of the Lord a vital one.