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Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.
(Romans 12:2)

The following are articles which address difficult questions without getting too in-depth. If you’d like to dig deeper, challenge your presuppositions, or seek to understand God’s underlying purpose, methods, and goals more fully, consider registering for our Discovery Series self-study program.


Isn’t the Philadelphia church promised, by Christ himself, deliverance from the hour of trial?

This question is based on the promise of Christ to the Philadelphia congregation recorded in Revelation 3. Christ is surely reminded of his warning to his disciples regarding their treatment in the world. How they would be handed over to death and hated for his name’s sake. In all this tribulation they are encouraged to endure patiently, thereby securing their salvation.

Aren’t previous examples of deliverance by God illustrative of the church’s deliverance from the Great Tribulation?

The answer to this question isn’t a simple one because the question itself has layers to it that must be resolved. This article looks into a few of those layers; the presuppositions behind the question, the characteristics of previous deliverance, and the motivation behind this deliverance.

According to 1 Thessalonians 5:9-10 the church is exempt from wrath, so isn’t it true they won’t enter the Day of the Lord?

The assurance and comfort expressed to believers in 1 Thessalonians 5:9-10 has limitations depending on one’s expectations for the Day of the Lord. Exemption from wrath is coexistent with the reconciliation to God obtained through belief in Christ. However, the promise of exemption from wrath only applies to God’s wrath, making one’s presupposition about the Day of the Lord a vital one.

Isn’t it true that none of the Old Testament passages about the Great Tribulation mention the church?

By identifying the work the Lord is doing to unify the faithful in Israel with the faithful Gentiles through his redemptive work, it becomes clear that there is no expectation that those called into Christ should be mentioned at all in the Old Testament. That they are mentioned indirectly maintains the mystery of God, yet enables God to be glorified by fulfilling his work in Christ and his promise to Abraham.

What is the Real Connection between Israel and the Church?

In this article we look at God’s redemptive work in Christ through the topical framework of the kingdom of God. To do this, we review Christ’s kingdom-building process through the ages with the nation of Israel and with those who were not a people – the Gentiles. What we find is that the hopes of Israel and those faithful in Christ appear to point to a common destination.

Is there a difference between inheriting the Kingdom of God and dwelling in it?

The difference between inheriting the Kingdom of God and dwelling in it is derived from noticing the various characteristics used to describe the kingdom throughout the Bible. In some cases, these references are clearly physical and of the earth, while others are clearly spiritual and of the heavenly realm. This article looks at these differences and connects them with the will of God and his work in Christ.


Many of the questions addressed in these articles come from topics covered in my recent book . . .

The Rapture Question – An Unfiltered View

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