Aren’t previous examples of deliverance by God illustrative of the church’s deliverance from the Great Tribulation?

The answer to this question isn’t a simple one because the question itself has layers to it that must be resolved. This article looks into a few of those layers; the presuppositions behind the question, the characteristics of previous deliverance, and the motivation behind this deliverance.

According to 1 Thessalonians 5:9-10 the church is exempt from wrath, so isn’t it true they won’t enter the Day of the Lord?

The assurance and comfort expressed to believers in 1 Thessalonians 5:9-10 has limitations depending on one’s expectations for the Day of the Lord. Exemption from wrath is coexistent with the reconciliation to God obtained through belief in Christ. However, the promise of exemption from wrath only applies to God’s wrath, making one’s presupposition about the Day of the Lord a vital one.

Is There a Third Temple to be Built in Jerusalem?

This discussion focuses on looking at the underlying purpose for the destruction of the first two temples; it’s derived from God’s correction upon Judah for their failure to keep their covenant with him. This occurred first when Israel(1) (the Northern kingdom) was taken captive and dispersed. Judah (the Southern kingdom) experienced this dispersion twice; onceContinue reading “Is There a Third Temple to be Built in Jerusalem?”

Does the Jewish temple have to be rebuilt before the great tribulation begins?

By briefly reviewing the history and purpose for Israel’s captivity and dispersion, we can begin to understand the work that God is continuing to do in Israel. There are, however, numerous compelling reasons why a third physical temple seems unlikely.

Isn’t it true that none of the Old Testament passages about the Great Tribulation mention the church?

By identifying the work the Lord is doing to unify the faithful in Israel with the faithful Gentiles through his redemptive work, it becomes clear that there is no expectation that those called into Christ should be mentioned at all in the Old Testament. That they are mentioned indirectly maintains the mystery of God, yet enables God to be glorified by fulfilling his work in Christ and his promise to Abraham.